PART 1

See the similarities and differences of two martial art pioneers, separated by race, religion, background and distance!  09/09/2011

Choi Hong Hi (9 November 1918 – 15 June 2002)

Edmund Kealoha “Ed” Parker (March 19, 1931 – December 15, 1990)

Learn how and why these two men from different cultures, different backgrounds, and different religions found that they could profoundly change how the martial arts are looked at and shared and taught throughout the world today.  How each man came up with nearly identical theories without having ever met (as far was anyone can tell), how each man seemed to know about the others art just by its descriptions and how each man defined and redefined there martial art of choice that no other (nearly) martial artist has done. The journey that both of these great martial artist took was long ago, during different generations, from different nations, and even different styles.  The age difference (13 years) between the two is interesting in that both men “defined” their martial art about the same time.  Both men sought to give new names, sometimes recycling names and at other times just redefining terms for their martial art. There are also striking differences.  Grandmaster Choi was short, standing only about five feet (152 cm) and was always slight in build, while Grandmaster Parker was 6 feet (183 cm) and always had a stocky build.  Grandmaster Choi, commonly called “General Choi” (he was a General in the South Korean Army from it’s birth and until his forced retirement in 1962, Gen. Choi has also especially since his passing been referred to as “Founder Choi, or Ambassador Choi.”  Grandmaster Parker was commonly referred to as Senior Grandmaster of the Art (referring to American Kenpo) but his senior students usually just called him by the humble moniker of Mr. Parker or the “old man” (just never to his face). Gen. Choi started to learn Karate (Shotokan) while he was a student worker in Japan in the 1930’s and Mr. Parker started to learn his art of Kenpo after first studying Judo and western style boxing.  Gen. Choi learned more out of self preservation as did Mr. Parker.  Gen. Choi lived in a world where his own country was occupied by another race of people and Mr. Parker lived in “paradise” but even paradise has its tough areas. Much has been written about both, Ed Parker has been written about more after his passing by many of his direct students like Lee Wedlake and his books like “Lessons with Ed Parker” and Rich Hale and his “The Kenpo Journal” and many others.  More was written about General Choi while he was alive oddly enough, this site has what may be the most complete info and interviews of General Choi, GM Kimm, He-young had and extensive interview prior to his death in Taekwondo Times, and has a book on the history of Taekwondo since. One of the most striking similarities is the use of Mr. Parker and his “Marriage of Gravity/Gravitational Marriage” and Gen. Choi’s “sine wave.”  Both had seemed to develop this concept in terms of use in the martial arts sometime before the 1980s but both define them in the late seventy or early eighty’s.  “Marriage of Gravity” is defined as “The uniting of mind, breath and strength while simultaneously dropping your body weight along with the execution of your natural weapon(s).  Timing all of these factors with the dropping  of your body weight greatly adds to the force of your strikes.  This combined action literally causes a marriage with gravity, and makes vertical use of BODY MOMENTUM while employing the dimension of HEIGHT. (ED PARKER’S ENCYCLOPEDIA OF KENPO 1992 ISBN 1-4392-4198-8) The term “Sine Wave” Sine wave motion is a movement unique to original Taekwon-do to create maximum force in every moment according to the theory of power. In almost every moment this sinewave is utilized. Sine wave is natural and simple, and often I heard an instructor say: “Simple and natural = beautiful”. 

What we actually do by performing this sine wave in Taekwon-do techniques is moving the center of our body mass by means of a motion, which would look like a sinus wave if we would draw it.

There are some key benefits to using sine wave that are linked to the training secrets of Taekwon-Do. Moving our center of mass in the motion of a sine wave requires us to keep our arms and legs bent while the body is in motion. To keep the arms and legs bent during motion we need to be relaxed. Relaxing the body adds speed to a technique because we are not all tensed up with one part of the body working against another. Small increases in speed produces large increases the power of a technique. 

Secondly, when employing a sine wave we have to use the knee spring properly. That is to say bending the knee is what moves our body up and down as we move forward. Using the knee spring while our body is in motion allows our center of mass to travel along a curve, which by definition is another form of acceleration, which then helps us accelerate into a target. Explanation of sinewave by the founder of Taekwon-Do – General Choi Hong Hi – during a seminar in Poland (1999).

Finally, when using sine wave we are dropping our body downwards at the end of the technique with helps us use gravity to our advantage and keep our acceleration building until the point of impact.  As you read the two, the concepts are similar, but yet, not exactly the same, although the end result is.  These two terms, tend to be the most striking, however, both gentleman, also defined or redefined the terms used.  Both sought to standardized the terms used in order to make teaching their arts not really more “simple” but more of an ability to teach as many as possible to promote their arts to the masses.

https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/lee-wedlakes-kenpo-karate-mp3/id381705015?mt=2

The IKKA (International Kenpo Karate Association) logo (left) and the ITF (International Taekwon-Do Federation logo (right) of the two founders organizations

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NOMINATING GEN. CHOI FOR THE MOST HONORABLE INCLUSION IN THE HALL OF FAME

Absent political considerations there should be no valid reason to exclude Gen. Choi from any Martial Art Hall Of Fame. While his many accomplishments speak for themselves, many do not realize that some of what he did was unprecedented & at times unmatched in the TKD world. However because at various points in his life some of his personal political views concerning his unfairly divided homeland of Korea & certain governmental leaders back home resulted in some negativity that has unfortunately tainted his TKD record.

While Gen. Choi’s personal politics & views are his own, many feel that it should not impact what he did for TKD & how his work continues to influence millions globally in a very positive way. As a result you, as a TKD person, should take the time out to send an email to the new Taekwondowon in MuJu, South Korea respectfully requesting that Gen. Choi receive the highest honor possible for his international impact on TKD. We know 1 thing for sure, without Gen. Choi there would be no TKD. He of course named it. Now there still may have been another Korean Martial Sport that made it into the Olympics, but it would not have been TKD. So every single student of TKD, no matter his or her age, rank or location on this planet, owes some small debt of gratitude to Gen. Choi. PLEASE take a brief moment of your time to send an email to:
halloffame@tpf.kr

It is the least we can do & if not Gen. Choi, then really, who does deserve this honor?

You are not limited with your nominations. You can feel free to nominate anyone you feel is worthy. However if we don’t succeed in getting Gen. Choi honored, it probably will not be possible initially to have any of his followers acknowledged. Also please understand the Taekwondowon put out requests on their Korean language Facebook Page & website. They have also sent a request to the WTF for nominations. So if you don’t nominate Gen. Choi who will? There is no apparent visible outreach to the ITF side. Please do not allow politics to continue to get disrupt the martial art way of TKD’s “DO”! The Taekwondowon needs to here from all of us, as they are on record saying their new TKD Park is for all. So lets please give them the opportunity to demonstrate that wonderful posture with fair & just action by honoring the man who started it all.
Thank you

 

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Black Belts Win!

imageTwo Kido Kwan black belts competed April 26, 2014 in Corpus Christi, Texas U.S.A.

Eddie (left) 3rd place breaking, 2nd place Patterns(Choong Moo), 2nd place Weapons (Bo Staff)
Alan (right) 3rd place breaking (Me and Eddie tied), 2nd place sparring, 1st place Patterns (Po Eun !!! ), 1st place Weapons (Bo Staff).

 

These two black belts are direct students of Master (senior) Gwen F. Hall, VIII Dan (center) who helped judge in the tournament hosted by WarCats by Reymundo Gonzales, VII Dan.

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Survey Update

IF you take this survey, your answers will only count if you fill in the basic information asked.  This is in part to insure we don’t have duplicate posts etc. [SURVEYS 2]

AS OF 30/ APR/2014 

1218 VOTES

President Choi, Jung-Hwa aka ITF-C HQ Middlesex United Kingdom  26%

President Chang Ung aka ITF-NK HQ Vienna, Austria                            28%

President Pablo Trajtenberg aka ITF-V HQ Beindorn, Spain                  20%

Secretary General Oh Chang Jin aka ITF-K HQ Seoul South Korea       10%

GM Hwang, Kwang-sung aka UITF Manchester , CT USA                       09%

GM Rhee, Ki-ha aka FGMR                                                                            04%

GM Phap Lu aka Chan Hon Ryu                                                                    00%

Choi at Press Conference

Choi, Jung-hwa

Chang, Ung

Chang, Ung

 

Pablo Trajtenberg

Pablo Trajtenberg

 Oh Chang Jin

Oh Chang Jin

 

Hwang Kwang-sung

Hwang Kwang-sung

 

Rhee, Ki-ha

Rhee, Ki-ha

Phap Lu

Phap Lu

 

 

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Taekwon-Do, Taekwondo, Tae Kwon Do, TaeKwon Do, A study of Words

Lots and lots of things have been said about “what is Taekwon-Do” and how to “spell Taekwon-Do”, Taekwondo, taekwondo, Taekwon do, Tae Kwon Do, TaeKwonDo etc.  Of course, going strictly by the way it is written in Taekwon-Do’s country of origin, well, it is just 태권도.  It has no space, no capitals and no hyphens.  Of course, the same is true when we look at the Hanja (Chinese/Japanese) way to write Taekwon-Do 跆拳道.

So, why do we have so many ways of writing this rather simple three syllable word?  Well, we could start with the etymology of this word.  Taekwon-Do is not a native Korean term!  It is a word of Chinese origin that has as many words in many tongues almost exclusively adopted by Korea.  The word also has or parts of the word also have strong Japanese ties.  As most know, Korea was a nation state of the Japanese Empire for some time.  So it isn’t unreasonable to see that terms of Japanese origin would sneak into the Korean vocabulary.  But before we head into the etymology of Taekwon-Do, let’s see what other authors, masters, grandmasters of Taekwon-Do say….

As to why the I.T.F. and the Kido Kwan uses the spelling of  “Taekwon-Do” well, simple put, General Choi when as personally by me, said the spelling in English should be “Taekwon-Do” with the emphasis on the – as “Taekwon” is the art, and greeting, and “Do” is the philosophy.

Choi, Hong-hi stated in his book TAEKWON-DO THE ART OF SELF-DEFENSE copyright: 1965 that “Translated from Korean, “Tae” (t’ae) literally means to jump or kick or smash with the foot.  “Kwon” denotes a fist-chiefly to punch or destroy with the hand or fist.  “Do” means an art, or way or method.  Thus taken collectively “Taekwon-Do” indicates the punches, flying kicks, blocks, dodges and interceptions with the hands, arms and feet to the rapid destruction of the opponent (Choi 14).

In the fourth edition of Choi, Hong-hi’s book TAEKWON-DO (The Korean Art of Self-Defence) copyright: 1995 and more commonly referred to as the “condensed encyclopedia” he states: “Translated literally “Tae” stands for jumping of flying, to kick with the foot. “Kwon” denotes the fist-chiefly to punch or destroy with the hand or fist.  “Do” means an art or way-the right way built and paved by the saints and sages in the past.  Thus taken collectively “Taekwon-Do” indicates the mental training and the techniques of unarmed combat for self-defence as well as health, involving the skilled application of punches, kicks, blocks and dodges with bare hands and feet to the rapid destructions of the moving opponent or opponents” (Choi 15).

Cho, Shi-hak also known as Henry Cho in his 1968 book KOREAN KARATE Free Fighting Techniques states that “Tae-kwon is the Korean word for karate recently adopted by the Korean Tae-Kwon do Federation. Tae-kwon do (tae meaning foot; kwon, fist; and do, martial art) is identical to Japanese karate, and the title is a literal description of an art consisting of foot and hand techniques.” (Cho 21)

Chun, Rhin-moon also known as Richard Chun in his 1976 book TAE KWON DO The Korean Martial Art stated that “Tae Kwon Do, “The Art of Kicking and Punching,” incorporates the abrupt, linear movements of Karate and the flowing, circular patterns of Kung Fu with its own incomparable kicking techniques to form an integrated system unique to Korea. (Chun 7, 8)

Son, Duk-sun & Robert Clark in their book KOREAN KARATE THE ART OF TAE KWON DO copyright 1968 says “Tae Kwon Do is a Korean martial art.”  And “Tae Kwon Do is essentially discipline: discipline of the mind, the body, and the spirit.” (Son 1, 5)

Jimmy M.S. Too in his book THE TECHNIQUES OF TAEKWON-DO A Modern International Martial Art simply states “Taekwon-do is an effective and superior form of martial art.  It employs hand and foot techniques for self defense.” (Too 28)

B.S. Huan in his book TAEKWON-DO says “TaeKwon-Do is the Korean martial art that was perfected by the Korean TaeKwon-Do movement in 1955 to supersede ancient Korean fighting arts.  And “Tae” means to jump or kick or smash with the feet” “Kwon means to block, punch, and strike with the hand or fist. And “Do” means “An art”. (Huan 17)

Clearly, we also have different ways of defining exactly what Taekwon-Do is as well.

 

Choi, Hong-hi “Taekwon-Do: The Art of Self Defense” Daeha Publication: Seoul, Korea. 1965

Choi, Hong-hi “Taekwon-Do: The Korean Art of Self Defense” International Taekwon-Do Federation: Printed in New Zealand. 1995

Cho, Shihak Henry “KOREAN KARATE Free Fighting Techniques” Charles E. Tuttle Company: Publishers Copyright 1968

Chun, RhinMoon Richard “TAE KWON DO The Korean Martial Art” Harper & Row Publishers, Copyright 1976

Son, Duk-sun & Robert Clark “KOREAN KARATE THE ART OF TAE KWON DO” Prentice Hall Press, Copyright 1968

Jimmy M.S. Too “The Techniques of Taekwon-Do” Bushido Publishers, Singapore, Copyright November 1975

B.S. Huan “TAEKWON-DO” Russ International Publishers Singapore, Copyright 1975

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image image image

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Passing of Nam, Taej-hi

It’s with deep regret that we notify you that Grandmaster Nam, Tae-Hi (March 19, 1923- November 7, 2013) has passed away in a hospital near his home in Garden Grove, CA. USA. More to follow soon!

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2013 Midwest Open

The 2013 Midwest Open is less than 6 weeks away. I want to personally invite you to the Midwest Open Taekwondo Championship November 23rd & 24th in Decatur, Illinois. Every year we try to make things better than the last if possible. We will be starting the weekend with registrations & pre-registrations on Friday November 22nd from 5:00-8:00pm at the Decatur Conference Center & Hotel. There will also be plenty of training area for teams to practice before the event.
2013 midwest open poster

2013 midwest open packet
Saturday will consist of forms, sparring and grand champion award in forms along with our Chris Canning award and black belt scholarship. New for 2013!!! We have added electronic chest protectors (kpp) for all black belt divisions. The socks will be available for black belt sparer’s to rent for $5 at the tournament.

Sunday will be breaking, weapons and grand champion in those events. Again this year we will be having grand champion in forms, breaking and weapons and anyone that places 1st in their division will be allowed to compete for that award. We have added another Grand champion award in breaking as well. All grand champion awards this year will be 6′ trophies!!! In addition to those awards we will be having our special Chris Canning grand champion award. Instructors please submit names of anyone that you would like to recommend for this award.
 
We will also be having our Chris Canning $500 scholarship awarded to 1 black belt at the event. Please go to the tournament website for information.

We have worked hard on the tournament schedule to make sure that everyone knows what time they will compete. We have also improved our tournament website by adding spectator passes online. We also have discount competitor rates for multiple family members.

The tournament venue consists of a huge competition area with 6 matted rings and electronic scoring, staging area and separate warm up area. We also have a play area for young ones. The Decatur Conference Center & Hotel also is offering discount rates for rooms for anyone that is at the Midwest Open Taekwondo Championship. The newly remodeled hotel offers 2 restaurants, and indoor pool, hot tub and sauna, sports bar and a video game area.

As we have done in past years if you are an instructor bringing competitors, you will receive 1 free night stay at the tournament hotel for every 10 pre-registered competitors! The top 3 schools will receive an award. All children age 12 and under will receive an award and everyone that wins in forms, breaking or weapons has an opportunity at grand champion awards regardless of age or belt rank.

I am attaching all the tournament information for you and your school to look over. Feel free to pass this on. We are making every effort to assure that everyone has a great experience. The tournament staff will do their best to make sure the event runs smoothly and expeditiously. That all competitors, guests, coaches and officials are treated fairly and with respect. And that competitors get great and fair competition along with a great experience. I am always available for questions, comments or concerns before, during or after the event. If you have any questions do not hesitate to call or email me.

Feel free to get all the tournament information or sign up online at www.midwestchampionships.com

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Totally Tae Kwon Do

The Kido Kwan and several of it’s members have  been featured or written articles that have appeared in Totally Tae Kwon Do, which is a downloadable PDF magazine for Tae Kwon Do enthusiasts across the globe. The magazine dedicated to all aspects of the martial art of Tae Kwon Do, arguably the world’s most popular martial art and Olympic sport. The magazine caters for all styles of the art, so whether you’re Ch’ang Hon/ITF, KKW/WTF or any other style of Tae Kwon Do, then the magazine will be of interest to you. So if you do Taekwon-Do, Taekwondo or Tae Kwon Do, then this magazines for you.

http://www.totallytkd.com/

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Cherokee Nation Loses its first Martial Arts Grandmaster

An instructor of one of the Kido Kwan Directors has sadley passed…

7534_peo_130813_Vann-LBY STAFF REPORTORS of the CHEROKEE PHOENIX

WICHITA, Kan. – Wilson Vann, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and master instructor of martial arts, died on Aug. 8 at age 89.

Black-Belt-Testing-20110807a

Grandmaster In Hui Won, Grandmaster Wilson Vann, Grandmaster Kyo Yoon Lee

Born on June 11, 1924, in Short, Okla., he eventually joined the U.S. Navy and served in the Pacific theater during World War II. After the war, he worked 36 years at Cessna Aircraft in Wichita before retiring and moving to Tahlequah, Okla., where he resided until 2011.

He owned Judo and Tae Kwon Do schools for more than 50 years, which produced many champions in national and international competition. He had a reputation as a noted instructor of martial arts in the U.S. and Korea, specializing in Tae Kwon Do and Kodokan Judo. He held a black belt in Judo and a ninth-degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do from the Han Moo Kwan. Han Moo Kwan was founded in August 1954 by Kyo Yoon Lee and is one of the nine original Kwans that later formed Kukkiwon Tae Kwon Do.

Vann is survived by his wife Loretta (Riner) of 65 years, three children, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

According to a Cherokee Nation email, “Vann was a proud Cherokee and a WWII veteran. For many years he taught young men and women Tae Kwon Do. Using martial arts as a platform, he also taught them much of what they needed to succeed in life. That teaching included working hard, being honest, never giving up. His students learned courage and commitment. He left us hundreds of heroes in waiting. They will support their families, help their friends, maintain a sense of honor; and, God willing, live a peaceful life. But when courage is needed, they will have it. And in great part, it will be due to the quiet, unassuming mentoring of a great man.”

GM-Vann-20060205

GM Wilson Vann

Funeral and graveside services were expected be held on Aug. 14 at the Old Mission Cemetery and Funeral Home in Wichita. Memorials in Vann’s memory may be made to the American Cancer Society. Thoughts and memories may be shared in the online guestbook at oldmissionmortuary.com.

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